Oyster Mushroom Extract

Pleurotus ostreatus

Nammex Oyster mushroom is processed by hot water extraction into a fine powder suitable for encapsulation or beverages.

Beta (1-3),(1-6)-glucansGreater than 35%
StarchLess than 3.0%
Oyster Mushroom Extract
Nammex Mushroom Certificates

Nammex Oyster is 100% Pure Mushroom

No added fillers, starch, grains or mycelium

Oyster Mushroom History

Oyster mushrooms grow naturally worldwide in all types of forests although they are primarily found on deciduous trees. Named for their oyster-like shape and color, they are a readily cultivated mushroom that have become a popular food in Asia, Europe and now North America.

Oyster Mushroom Uses

Pleurotus has demonstrated immunological activity in many research publications. Of significant value is the presence of statins, which occur in sufficient quantities to be of benefit. Numerous studies have shown the ability of Pleurotus to lower cholesterol when taken orally.

Proudly Made in China

In 1996, CEO and Founder of Nammex, Jeff Chilton organized organic mushroom production in China. That initiative paid off and today all Nammex mushrooms are grown deep or wildcrafted in the mountains of China by our Certified Organic production partners. Learn more about our growers in China.

Not All Medicinal Mushrooms Products are Created Equal

US lab-grown Oyster is mycelium grown on grain. Analysis has shown that US Oyster mycelium on grain has low levels of beta-glucan and very high levels of starch. Nammex only uses 100% organic fruiting bodies which are rigorously tested and guaranteed for active compounds. Learn more about the mycelia myth and the 10 Questions to Ask about Your Mushroom Supplement.

Active Compounds

Beta (1>3),(1>6)-glucans; Statins

Product Attributes

Certified Organic; Kosher; Vegan; Gluten-free; Non-GMO

Oyster Mushroom Research

  • Alarcon J. et al., Production and Purification of Statins from Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycetes) Strains. Z. Naturforsch. 58c, 62Ð64 (2003)
  • Gunde-Cimerman N., Medicinal Value of the Genus Pleurotus. International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol. 1, pp. 69-80 (1999)
  • Lo Y.C. et al., Comparative Study of Contents of Several Bioactive Components in Fruiting Bodies and Mycelia of Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms. International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, 14(4): 357–363 (2012)
  • Synytsya A. et al., Glucans from fruit bodies of cultivated mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus eryngii: Structure and potential prebiotic activity. Carbohydrate Polymers 76 (2009) 548–556